Gods and Men

On Day 2 in Greece we grabbed espresso and Greek yogurt and walked to the National Archaeology Museum for a mind-blowing look back in time. I’m just discovering their fantastic website as I go back and learn about the pieces I especially loved.

I didn't photograph one of my favorites: Zeus in Warrior II pose.

I didn’t photograph one of my favorites: Zeus in Warrior II pose.

Can you identify the major players in this tomb decoration?  This gets easier with each museum visit.  Gods are physically larger than mere mortals, and they have there distinguishing symbols.

Can you identify the major players in this tomb decoration? This gets easier with each museum visit. Gods are physically larger than mere mortals, and they have there distinguishing symbols.

This photo doesn't capture the bronze well.

This photo doesn’t capture the bronze well, the Artemision Jockey was recovered from the sea in 1928. The statue itself is much earlier: about 140 B.C.

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Artemis, Demeter, and the Titan Anytos are the three major heads in the background. Themis from Rhamnous (ca. 300 BC.) is talking with Dan.

Pain.  Anguish.  Art.

Pain. Anguish. Art.

Heads!

Heads!

I thought those were grapes, but the Statuette of Artemis is adorned with fertility symbols (28 breasts!), along with figures of Nike, griffins, sphinxes and bees while lions sit on the goddess’s arms.

One of my favorites.  A memorial to Dionysis in the front and Aphrodite in the background.

One of my favorites. I loved the statue in the foreground, but I didn’t understand it at the time. From the website I learn it is a statuette of Ephesian Artemis, made of pentelic marble.
In the background is a mere mortal woman.

Busts!

Busts!

First, I should mention this exhibit was a delight to photograph! In the glass case there are physical artifacts, holographic projects, and reflections on the casing. Lovely!

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The Mechanism.


The device above comes from the exhibition: “THE ANTIKYTHERA SHIPWRECK The ship – the treasures – the Mechanism.” We were lucky enough to learn a bit more about the device known as the world’s first computer.

After a quiet lunch among lovely but less priceless statues in the museum cafe, we dashed back to our apartment. We had a fun mini-adventure meeting our rental car. Manolis the driver was late since he had to avoid a protest in Syntagma Square. Additionally street parking in Athens is rather precious, so we moved the car 2-3 times in order to get the paper work filled out and the little yellow car inspected. Manolis drove us through a scenic pass of the Acropolis hill to avoid the protest and get us on the National Road. If you know anything about Greek traffic and drivers, you’ll understand what a favor this was. Thank you Swift!

More on Greek traffic and our road adventures soon.

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About mcddanielle

Happy Adventurer in the game of life!
This entry was posted in Art, Travel, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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